बचपन में कैंसर को हराया, अब उसी पर रिसर्च

Monday, September 14, 2020
|
|
नित्या मोहन कैंसर इम्यूनोथैरेपी में पीएचडी कर रही हैं

रिसर्च स्कॉलर नित्या मोहन जब मात्र सात साल की थीं, तब उन्हें कैंसर  का सामना करना पड़ा। लेकिन समय पर इलाज, परिवार के सहयोग और खुद के हौसले ने कैंसर को हरा दिया। इतनी कम उम्र में कैंसर का मतलब एक छोटे बच्चे की समझ से परे था। लेकिन कैंसर के इलाज के दौरान की यादें नित्या के मन में इतनी गहराई तक समाईं कि बड़े होने पर भी उनके मन में कई सवाल उठते रहे, जैसे आखिर यह कैंसर है क्या? इसका कारण क्या होता है? क्या कोई ऐसी वैक्सीन नहीं है, जो कैंसर को होने से रोक सके? और इन्हीं सवालों के जवाब ढूंढने के लिए उन्होंने कैंसर पर रिसर्च करने का निश्चय किया। उनका वह इरादा इतना प्रबल था कि उसे हकीकत में बदलना ही पड़ा।वर्ष 2016 में उनका चयन जर्मन कैंसर रिसर्च सेंटर, हाइडलबर्ग, जर्मनी के लिए हो गया। जहां से इस समय वे कैंसर इम्यूनोथैरेपी में पीएचडी कर रही हैं

Lockdown Blues: Children with special needs struggle with shrinking space

Wednesday, June 3, 2020
|
Children with special needs play at a school for autism in Yemen. Photo by Dana Smillie World Bank

Children on autism spectrum face a lot of distress due to sudden change in routines. Abrupt closure of schools, playgrounds and other recreational outlets is resulting in more frequent meltdowns. Children unable to go outdoors have a lot of pent up energy which leads to aggression. Their schedules have been altered and they are also unable to visit the intervention centres. It is a tough situation for both the child and the caregiver. Children from poorer families are the most affected by closing in of the space

E-cigarette bill is not worth the paper it is printed on

Monday, December 9, 2019
|
|
Electronic cigarette is one of the nicotine delivery devices.

The Prohibition of Electronic Cigarettes Bill 2019 is an absolutely diluted piece of legislation, which fails to address the grave issue of nicotine-laced products. It’s just an all bark no bite legislation, not worth the paper it’s printed on. It partially addresses only e-cigarettes, which is less than one percent of the real problem of nicotine abuse. Such piecemeal restriction of e-cigarettes will only help the tobacco manufacturers and cigarette companies as it will eliminate their competition

India and Malaria: The constant wrangle

Friday, October 5, 2018
|
|
Malaria, at one time a rural disease has diversified into various ecotypes. Source: Pixabay

While the number of cases has declined by 60 per cent over 2001, there are concerns that malaria is still being under reported. Other issues include the systemic resistance to drugs which were previously used to limit vector growth. Around 35 countries have been certified to be free of malaria and another 21 on their way to reach their target of zero transmission by the year 2020. In our neighbourhood, Sri Lanka and Maldives have also achieved the malaria-free status and Bhutan will be there soon.

Shodhgram: Where science meets compassion

Sunday, February 25, 2018
|
The in-patient ward and rooms for patients, all on the pattern of traditional hutments

Founded by doctor couple, Abhay Bang and Rani Bang, and run on Gandhian philosophy of Gram Swaraj (self governance), Shodhgram offers affordable and compassionate services to the people, especially tribals of the region. It has also devised unique solutions to the most pressing community health issues. For instance, Indian government replicated Shodhgram’s concept of home-based mother and newborn care through ASHA. 

Here is what India can do to avoid medical tragedies

Sunday, December 17, 2017
|
|
Government health system expands and begins to provide quality care. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The recent incidents of medical negligence and over pricing have spurred strong criticism of private players with Delhi government cancelling the licence of one hospital. What escapes the eye, however, is the constant support since 1990s that has led to growth of private sector at the cost of affordable government or public healthcare. The only solution is roping in private resources for public health system with regulations.

‘Rare diseases policy will help 70 million patients in India’  

Monday, July 24, 2017
|
|
Persons and families living with rare diseases at a recent awareness event . Source: ORDI

Around 70 million patients, mostly children, living with rare diseases in India have something to cheer about as the Union government has formally recognised their existence and formed a policy to address diagnostic and treatment gaps There are over 7,000 rare diseases in the world of which only 450 have been identified through reported cases in India. Most of these diseases go undiagnosed and most families can’t afford the high cost of treatment. 

'Pharma companies don't want any regulation'

Saturday, January 3, 2015
|
|
Protest against unregulated clinical trials. Source: Uday Foundation

Clinical trials in India have for long been inviting controversy due to lack of transparency and regulatory mechanism. While replying to a question in Rajya Sabha in March 2013, the then Union Health Minister Ghulam Nabi Azad said 438 deaths took place during clinical trials in 2011 while 668 people died during 2010. While hearing the public interest litigation (PIL) filed by Swasthya Adhikar Manch in 2012, the Supreme Court asked the Central government to come up with more stringent regulatory and monitoring set up to stop exploitation

Death in their breaths

Saturday, November 29, 2014
|
|
Sandstone mines of Rajasthan are deathbeds for many. Source:GRAVIS

Though dust is of trivial significance to us, it kills millions of workers in Indian industries and mines. Silicosis, one of the many lung disorders caused by dust, is not only untreatable but also the commonest and most widespread of all occupational diseases. Exposure to large amount of free silica can pass unnoticed since it is odourless, non-irritant and hence is confused with ordinary dust. The problem is more severe in unorganised industries like slate pencil cutting, stone cutting and agate industry since these are not covered by any legislation.

Take it to the heart

Thursday, September 4, 2014
|
|
Know your heart challenges the notion that health is solely an individual's responsibility.

Are you free to be healthy? Can you cut back on junk food, jog around and reduce booze and cigarettes of your own will? "Yes," you might say, "we live in a democracy and can choose how to live." You are right but only partially. In the present times, junk food pervade not just the food courts but also what's cooked in our home kitchens, most of the open spaces for walking and jogging have been turned into parking lots and it's quite easy to relapse into smoking with surrogate tobacco promotions all around us. In fact, when it comes to choosing between various options, we don't have an absolute say. The State has already got that covered.

Tying the knots of health care system- II

Thursday, March 27, 2014
|
|
Noble profession: Nurses adjusting a doctor's mask in Calcutta during World War II. Source: Cecil Beaton/Wikicommons

India's health care system is one of the most privatised in the world. Due to insufficient expansion of the public health system and overall private sector friendly policies of the state, the vast majority of doctors passing out from medical colleges have joined the private sector. In 1950 there were 60,000 MBBS doctors, now there are 7.5 lakh MBBS, equal number of AYUSH doctors and most of them are private providers. Added to this is the tremendous growth of corporate hospitals, starting with the Apollo Hospital in Chennai in 1983. 

Tying the knots of health care system

Monday, January 6, 2014
|
|
Noble profession: Nurses adjusting a doctor's mask in Calcutta during World War II. Source: Cecil Beaton/Wikicommons

India’s health care system is one of the most privatised in the world. Thanks to policy of the government to encourage the growth of the private sector, especially since the 1990s, the share of private sector in various components of health care in India today is very high. Due to insufficient expansion of the public health system and overall private sector friendly policies of the state, the vast majority of doctors passing out from medical colleges have joined the private sector. This trend has accelerated with production of higher proportion of postgraduate doctors since the 1970s.

Drug users yet to secure legal immunity

Tuesday, December 13, 2011
|
|

Tripti Tandon of Lawyers Collective talks to GOI Monitor about a recent case which brought the issue of immunity for drug users  under treatment into limelight

Q: Please tell us about the case of Aatish Suraj in which Supreme Court allowed Indian Harm Reduction Network to intervene?

A: The Aatish Suraj v State of NCT, Delhi SLP (Crl) No. 1965 of 2011 was an appeal arising out of an order passed by the Delhi High Court rejecting an application for revision of the Metropolitan Magistrate’s order framing charges for possession of ganja under Section 20 (b) (ii...

Safe blood efforts in vain

Saturday, October 1, 2011
|
|

On September 11 this year, 23 children with thalassemia tested HIV positive at a civil hospital in Junagarh, Gujarat, where they were reportedly getting regular blood transfusions. The saddest part is this is not the first incident of its kind. In July 2010, at least 56 thalassemic children had tested positive for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C after receiving blood at a government- run hospital in Jodhpur, Rajasthan. Another dozen thalassaemic children met the same fate at a Delhi hospital in 2008-09.

However, despite the rerun of these tragedies, nothing more than denials and...

Extraordinary measures, a rare case scenario

Thursday, November 10, 2011
|
|

The  movie ‘Extraordinary Measures’ released last year features a family conjuring all means possible to get treatment for their children who suffer from a hitherto unknown disease and are believed to be dying. The family’s struggle as it approaches politicians and pharma companies to seek help in finding cure for the disease depicts the never-say-die spirit of human beings. The disease they fight in the movie is called Pompe, one of the 8,000 rare diseases which are inflicting several children across the world. Rare diseases are called...

Generic drugs: Let's get the obit ready

Tuesday, July 12, 2011
|
|

Thanks to our fast still sedentary lifestyle, there are more medicines than fruits in our baskets and hence a big share of monthly budget is spent on buying them. According to a study published in international journal Lancet, despite living in a welfare state, 78 per cent of the health expenditure is met by Indians from their own pockets. Also 72 per cent of this total expenditure is spent on purchasing drugs. If you think that’s high be prepared for much higher medical bills in near future. The free trade agreement (FTA)

India is signing with the European Union (EU) will not only...

A perfect trap

Tuesday, June 7, 2011
|
|

Stem cell industry is playing on the emotions of naïve patients and families promising a future which may not really exist

In January this year, doctors at a corporate hospital in Delhi claimed to have treated an Iraqi patient of paraplegia using stem cells. The patient, who had lost sensation in his lower limb, was said to be able to stand now.

Meanwhile doctors at another private hospital...

Pretence of a protection

Tuesday, January 10, 2012
|
|

It’s imperative to save our children against diseases, but does that justify mindless immunisation drives like the one involving pentavalent vaccine?  

On December 15, 2011, a girl child died in Kerala, within 24 hours of being administered the newly-introduced pentavalent vaccine. While authorities declared that the infant died of breathlessness probably due to breastfeeding, the tragic incident seems to have brought alive the worst fears of health...

Subscribe to RSS - Health